It's all about the space Benjamins

The Quasi Universal Intergalactic Denomination (Quid for short) are coins custom-built for purchasing goods and services in space.

BBC News

The days of bringing a wad of wrinkly $5 bills to space are over. Finally, a form of currency built for space travellers by National Space Centre scientists is here.

According to this BBC News story, the Quasi Universal Intergalactic Denomination (Quid for short) are coins custom-built for purchasing goods and services in space. The currency was designed by the U.K.'s National Space Centre and the University of Leicester for foreign exchange service Travelex.

The rounded, disc-shaped coins look a bit like skipping stones. Thanks to being made from the same polymer as nonstick pans, they will not stick to omelettes.

In the article, University of Leicester Professor George Fraser contends that normal earth-coins are no good for space travelers; traditional coins have sharp edges that could damage spacesuits and other spacewear when they are flying around in zero-gravity conditions.

Furthermore, ATM cards and credit cards are also out of the question for space-use. The magnetic strips could be ruined by cosmic radiation, and there are still very few cash machines in space.

According to Travelex, the going exchange rate is about $12.69 to the space Quid. However, thanks to Jupiter's struggling economy and the cancellation of Pluto as a planet, the Quid's value could drop significantly in the coming months.

[Via Geekologie.]

 

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