Italy shoots down Samsung's iPhone 4S injunction attempt

An Italian judge has rejected Samsung's effort to keep Apple's iPhone 4S from being sold in the country. The decision matches one from a French judge last month.

Apple's iPhone 4S, the target of Samsung's injunction attempts.
Apple's iPhone 4S, the target of Samsung's injunction attempts Apple

The other shoe has dropped in Samsung's efforts to block sales of Apple's iPhone 4S in France and Italy.

In a decision today, an Italian judge rejected Samsung's request from early October, which asked for a block on the sales of Apple's latest iPhone in the country.

The decision follows a similar one by a French court last month, which denied Samsung's request to ban the phone in France and required the company to pay 100,000 euros worth of Apple's legal fees.

Italian news outlet ANSA today first reported the news, which was spotted by FOSS Patents.

"We are disappointed with today's decision by the Milan court regarding Samsung's preliminary injunction motion," Samsung said in a statement issued to CNET. "We will review the ruling and consider all available measures to further protect our intellectual property rights and stop this free riding on our technology."

Apple did not respond to a request for comment on the decision.

Samsung originally announced its legal effort for an injunction in a blog post, where it unveiled plans to accuse Apple of infringing two of its patents it held related to wireless technology. That included use of the Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) standard for 3G phones.

Nonetheless, the iPhone 4S was launched in Italy without a ban in place , with an Italian judge putting off making a decision while giving both companies additional time to provide the court with information ahead of further hearings.

The spat is just a part of a larger battle between the two companies in courts around the world. The dispute was kicked off with a U.S. lawsuit filed by Apple against Samsung in April of last year that said Samsung was violating its intellectual property in the design of its mobile devices, specifically the Galaxy series of smartphones and tablets. Samsung quickly countersued Apple, saying the company was infringing on multiple patents.

Updated at 1:02 p.m. PT with comment from Samsung.

 

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