It must be glove as HTC, Samsung, Toshiba palm off same April Fools' joke

HTC, Samsung and Toshiba find glove in a hopeless place with the Gluuv, Fingers, and Digit, this year's handiest April Fools' pranks.

Smell the Gluuv HTC
The power of glove is a curious thing. If you thought there was something familiar about HTC, Samsung and Toshiba's April Fools' jokes but couldn't put your finger it, it's because those like-minded japesters handed out the same joke.

Usually it's Samsung and Apple accusing each other of copying each other, but somehow these three all came up with the hi-i-larious idea of a smartglove: the HTC Gluuv,Samsung Fingers and Toshiba Digit.

Taking gesture control to a whole new (fictional) level, the Samsung Fingers let you make a call with a thumb-and-little-finger call-me gesture. Talk to the hand mode lets people record a message when you're too busy to talk to them, while the less said about the Pull My Finger feature the better.

Designed to join hands with the HTC One M8 , the HTC Gluuv lets you 'like' things you see in the real world on Facebook with a cheeky thumbs-up, or chirpse a nearby stunner by swiping right, Tinder-style.

Meanwhile if you cover your eyes with your fingers in the Toshiba Digit you get a 4K virtual reality display. Or you can pay for stuff with a wave of your gloved hand thanks to built-in contactless payment.


Even if HTC, Samsung and Tosh's smartgloves were real they still wouldn't be as cool as the factory-fresh Fujitsu NFC gauntlet, or the musical mittens worn by arm-waving pop dryad Imogen Heap, perhaps best known for elec-apella song 'Hide and Seek' as featured in The OC.

Samsung's UK operation also came up with a flight of fancy for April Fools' Day, involving pigeons wearing Wi-Fi routers to create a, wait for it... Fli-Fi network. Meanwhile Google set free a posse of Pokemon to round up on Google Maps.

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