Is your date a player? Send a text and find out

PlayerBlock claims to be the first ever text-based service that lets people investigate the dating habits of others.

You get asked out at a party, but you can't help but wonder if the guy is actually the stable, reliable charmer he appears to be. A new SMS and Web-based service called PlayerBlock lets you sneak off with your cell phone, send a text message and get the dirt faster than he can say, "How 'bout a movie?"

PlayerBook.com
PlayerBook.com

Based on the highly optimistic starting assumption that "people cheat and lie while dating and in relationships," PlayerBlock claims to be the first ever text-based service that enables romance seekers to investigate the dating habits of others (the Web already hosts similar date- and fidelity-tracking sites).

PlayerBlock members (who pay $4.99 per month for up to 100 messages) are encouraged to report both positive and negative dating experiences, with their insights then linked to the phone number of the tattled-on party.

"Did your date go well? Did you get played? Did they call when they said they would? We want to know! Tell us your innermost thoughts--don't let your neighbors get fooled just as you did," urges Global SMS, a privately owned company based in South Florida that came out with PlayerBlock.

Beyond the "Report a Player" and "Check a Player" features, the PlayerBlock service allows members to "Watch a Player." With that feature, Global SMS hopes to increase the audience beyond the dating arena and into the relationship space.

Potential for abuse of such a service, of course, is immense, as heartbreak and personal grudges could lead people to slam the objects of their frustration as a matter of vengeance. Then there's the subjectivity factor. After all, one person's player could be another person's inamorato--or something like that. And any truly poorly behaving lothario or lotharia could easily swap cell phone numbers regularly to avoid being associated with a negative charge.

The PlayerBlock service is currently supported by wireless carriers including AT&T, Sprint, Nextel, Verizon Wireless, Virgin Mobile and Boost Mobile. Others, including T-Mobile, will be coming soon.

Ah, whatever happened to the simple days of meeting at the sock hop?

 

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