Iraqi journalist killed at home

On Friday, Ali Shafeya Al-Moussawi, a special correspondent for Alive in Baghdad was found dead in his home. He was born December 16, 1984 and was discovered by his cousin following a raid on his street by the Iraqi National Guard. According to a recent p

Alive in Baghdad is one of the only destinations providing weekly video of life in Baghdad from an Iraqi perspective. The reporting examines current issues facing the country, and also features evergreen material documenting what life in a war-torn country looks like. The program has been profiled in numerous media reports, has garnered numerous awards, and has grown a loyal following.

On Friday, Ali Shafeya Al-Moussawi, a special correspondent for Alive in Baghdad was found dead in his home. He was born December 16, 1984 and was discovered by his cousin following a raid on his street by the Iraqi National Guard. According to a recent post on the site's blog, "The morgue report says that Ali took 31 bullets between the chest and the head and died immediately. He will be missed and remembered."

Al-Moussawi is survived by his mother and sister. The folks at Alive in Baghdad are collecting donations to cover the funeral costs and provide for his family. At last count, $1575.42 had been raised; please consider making a donation today.

I will be posting a more detailed story soon. In the meantime, stay tuned to BaghdadBrian's Twitter feed for frequent updates.

About the author

    Josh Wolf first became interested in the power of the press after writing and distributing a screed against his high school's new dress code. Within a short time, the new dress code was abandoned, and ever since then he's been getting his hands dirty deconstructing the media every step of the way. Wolf recently became the longest-incarcerated journalist for contempt of court in U.S. history after he spent 226 days in federal prison for his refusal to cooperate. In Media sphere, Josh shares his daily insights on the developing information landscape and examines how various corporate and governmental actions effect the free press both in the United States and abroad.

     

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