IPv6

Every now and again, you have to rebuild the Internet from scratch. That's what began in earnest in 2012, as the rollout of IPv6 made way for all our connected devices.

World IPv6 Launch graphic
Internet Society

Every now and again, you have to rebuild the Internet from scratch. That's what began in earnest in 2012, as many Net powers powered up their sites on a next-gen network technology called IPv6 that's got vastly more room for individual devices than the current IPv4 that's been used since the Internet began.

With the world running out of IPv4 Internet addresses , network engineers have to use various tricks to accommodate all the new mobile phones, PCs, and servers joining the Net every day. IPv6 makes room for them and for all the Internet-enabled fire alarms, pet collars, car computers, talking toys, vending machines, and bloodstream nanobots.

For more on this story, see Stephen Shankland's " IPv6: Come on in, the water's fine ."

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About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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