iPont shows no-glasses 3D conversion tech

Autostereoscopic display technology is gradually maturing. Hungarian company iPont is showing its technology on a Tridelity display that requires no glasses.

iPont is showing a device that converts dual-channel 3D video content for autostereoscopic display--3D that doesn't require glasses.
iPont is showing a device that converts dual-channel 3D video content for autostereoscopic display--3D that doesn't require glasses. iPont

iPont, a Hungarian specialist in 3D technology, is showing a new device at CES 2011 that can convert 3D video data into signals needed by autostereoscopic 3D displays--the kind that don't use glasses.

The company doesn't plan to sell the converter box, but it does showcase its real business focus on 3D software and online services such as format conversion and distributing 3D content to digital billboards.

The converter box shows the company's technology for converting a variety of 3D data formats into a variety of output signals for 3D display. It can accept Blu-ray and YouTube 3D video data, for example, though not if the Blu-ray video has been encrypted with the HDCP copy protection technology.

At CES, the company's demo uses a 65-inch screen from partner Tridelity, which makes autostereoscopic displays of both the single view (one user at a time) and multiview (multiple people can watch) varieties.

The display itself has a native resolution of 1920x1080, but because of the multiview technology, each 3D image actually has a resolution of 768x1080. (It's complicated, but to boil it down, five viewing angles and two eyes reduce the horizontal resolution to two-fifths the display's native pixel count.)

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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