iPhone app shows real-time traffic images

Visteon Corporation has introduced a mobile application for the iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad mobile digital devices that allows drivers to view traffic camera images captured within the previous minute.

TrafficJamCam, a new mobile application from Visteon Corporation, allows consumers to view traffic camera images captured within the previous minute, so they can plan their driving routes based on current road and traffic conditions. Visteon

Now drivers can view traffic camera images in real-time with a new application for the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.

TrafficJamCam, from Visteon, lets users see current traffic conditions on highways and major roadways of their choosing, faster and more accurately than typical radio updates or other traffic reports. This allows drivers to plan or change their driving routes based on current traffic or road conditions.

TrafficJamCam is available in separate applications for viewing traffic in 17 metropolitan areas: Atlanta; Boston; Chicago/Indiana; Charlotte, N.C.; Denver; Detroit; Jacksonville, Fla.; Las Vegas; Memphis, Tenn.; Minneapolis/St. Paul; New York City; Ohio/Northern Kentucky; Orlando, Fla.; Phoenix; Riverside, Calif.; Seattle; and Washington, D.C. The apps are available on the iTunes online store for $2.99 each.

"Our research shows that consumers continue to rely on mobile electronic devices and want to use them to stay connected while driving," said T.C. Wingrove, Visteon's senior manager for electronics innovation. "It's not a huge technical leap to adapt this application from a phone to an in-vehicle infotainment system. The feedback we can glean from consumers will help us refine the system, and will enable an enhanced solution by the time automakers are ready to launch an in-vehicle application."

Consumers can provide input on the application through iTunes, as well as Visteon's Web site, visteon.com.

 

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