iPad owners like screen, dislike lack of Flash

A survey of iPad owners shows overall they're happy with the device, though the lack of Flash support tops the list of dislikes.

Survey results released Thursday show that iPad owners overall are satisfied with the device, but there is some discontent with its lack of support for the Adobe Flash player.

A survey by ChangeWave Research showed that the top dislike reported by new owners of the Apple tablet was "lack of Adobe Flash" (11 percent), followed by "Internet connectivity issues" (9 percent), and "poor screen visibility/keeping it clean" (9 percent).

As to what features respondents like about the iPad, 21 percent said "screen size and quality," followed by "ease of use" at 15 percent, the "overall size and weight" at 12 percent, and "portability" at 10 percent.

The survey shows the top dislike is the device's lack of support for Adobe's Flash player. ChangeWave Research

The top feature respondents liked is the screen. ChangeWave

A second ChangeWave survey to measure future demand for the iPad, showed the iPad's rise as an e-reader. "Among e-Reader owners the Amazon Kindle (62%) remains the leader by a wide margin, but we note that the Apple iPad...is already registering a 16% share of the e-Reader market just weeks after its initial release," ChangeWave said in its survey to measure future demand for the iPad.

Ipad is rising quickly as an e-reader. ChangeWave Research

Overall satisfaction with the iPad was high. "The vast majority of owners believe the iPad is delivering on its promises--with three-in-four (74%) saying they're 'Very Satisfied' with their new tablet, and another 17% say they're 'Somewhat Satisfied.'" These ratings are nearly identical to the Apple iPhone, according to ChangeWave.

The surveys were done in May by ChangeWave. One survey queried 3,174 consumers to measure future demand for the iPad, and a second survey of 153 new iPad owners asked about their impressions of the new tablet device.

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