iPad LogMeIn app gets File Manager, Wake on LAN

LogMeIn plans to release an update of its LogMeIn Ignition app for the iPad that supports transferring files between an iPad and a remote computer.

LogMeIn Ignition iPad app's new File Manager feature lets you access data from a remote computer.
LogMeIn Ignition iPad app's new File Manager feature lets you access data from a remote computer. Screenshot by Dong Ngo/CNET

If you have been using the LogMeIn Ignition application as a cool way to run Windows 7 on the iPad , you now can do even more with it.

LogMeIn revealed today that it has just finished an update to the LogMeIn Ignition app for the iPad that adds a major new feature called File Manager.

Basically, now, in addition to allowing you to control a remote computer over the Internet using an iPad, the app also enables you to view and transfer files back and forth between the iPad and the remote computer.

I tried out the new version of the app and it worked very well. Once logged in, you have the options of controlling the remote computer or accessing its data. When the latter is picked, you're able to view the entire contents of the computer's entire hard drive or drives, including even hidden files and folders. Files and folders are organized somewhat like photo albums, and supported files (namely those for which the reader apps are installed on the iPad, such as photo, text, or PDFs) can be opened directly from the remote computer.

You can also copy and move files between the iPad and the remote computer.
You can also copy and move files between the iPad and the remote computer. Screenshot by Dong Ngo/CNET

You can also copy files and even folders from the remote computer onto the iPad. To do this, you can just Tab to the file or folder to select it, then tap on the copy (or move) button. Multiple files or folders can be copied, moved, or deleted at a time.

When a single file or folder is selected, you also have the option to rename it. Once a file or folder has been copied to the iPad, you can then copy or move it to another remote computer. Folders can also be updated with the original versions on the remote computer.

Unfortunately, you can't transfer files originally stored on the iPad, such as photos in its photo library, to the remote computer; nor can you put photos or videos from the remote computer into the iPad's libraries. This means each time you want to view files that you have copied from a remote computer, you'll need to run the LogMeIn Ignition app.

To make up for this, the app enables you to work with multiple computers at a time, including transfering files and folders directly among them, and you can switch between different computers via different windows, similar to switching between Web sites when using Safari.

So far this could be the biggest improvement of the app: now you can not only control the remote computer but also use it as something of a "cloud" data server for the iPad. Apart from the File Manager, the update also brings back the "Wake on LAN" function that was taken away with the previous update. With Wake on LAN you can turn the remote computer on via the Internet, eliminating the need to keep it running all the time.

According to LogMeIn, the update is now going through Apple's approval process and will soon be available to existing customers via Apple's App Store as a free update. The LogMeIn service can be used for free (there are also subscriptions with more features) via a Web browser. The LogMeIn Ignition app, which allows access from the iPad, on the other hand costs $30.

The app and the update also work with the iPhone and iPod Touch, via both cellular and Wi-Fi connections. With this update, the LogMeIn Ignition app is now worth its rather hefty price tag.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews 3D printers, networking/storage devices, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
Uber's tumultuous ups and downs in 2014 (pictures)
The best and worst quotes of 2014 (pictures)
A roomy range from LG (pictures)
This plain GE range has all of the essentials (pictures)
Sony's 'Interview' heard 'round the world (pictures)
Google Lunar XPrize: Testing Astrobotic's rover on the rocks (pictures)