iPad gaining quickly on Kindle

The iPad is closing the gap on Amazon's Kindle among e-reader owners, with the Apple tablet's ownership share doubling since August, according to ChangeWave Research.

Apple's iPad is gaining on Amazon's Kindle as a general-purpose e-reader, according to ChangeWave Research, more evidence of the irrepressible popularity of the Apple tablet.

The iPad's share among e-reader owners is up 16 points to 32 percent since August, roughly a mirror image of the Kindle, which has dropped 15 points to 47 percent, according to a ChangeWave Research survey of consumers highlighted in a research note released today.

"The e-Reader market has essentially become a two-horse race between the Amazon Kindle and the Apple iPad," ChangeWave said.

The rest of the market is comprised primarily of the Sony Reader at 5 percent and the Barnes & Noble Nook at 4 percent.

Very satisfied rating for iPad is high compared with the Kindle.
'Very satisfied' rating for iPad is high compared with the Kindle. ChangeWave Research
iPad and Kindle e-reader popularity is trending in opposite directions.
iPad and Kindle e-reader popularity is trending in opposite directions. ChangeWave Research

And ChangeWave said there are some distinct differences between how the iPad and Kindle are used as e-readers--not too surprising considering they are radically different designs (6-inch monochrome screen on the Kindle versus 9.7-inch color on the iPad) and price points (the Kindle is about one-third the price of the iPad).

A sizable 93 percent of Kindle owners are more likely to read books on their device, compared with 76 percent of iPad owners. And iPad owners are nearly five times more likely to read newspapers and magazines than their Kindle counterparts, and 15 times more likely to read blogs and news feeds, according to ChangeWave.

For the holidays, e-Reader demand remains strong, with 5 percent of respondents saying they are "very likely" to buy an e-Reader and 10 percent "somewhat likely" over the next 90 days, the market research firm said.

About the author

Brooke Crothers writes about mobile computer systems, including laptops, tablets, smartphones: how they define the computing experience and the hardware that makes them tick. He has served as an editor at large at CNET News and a contributing reporter to The New York Times' Bits and Technology sections. His interest in things small began when living in Tokyo in a very small apartment for a very long time.

 

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