iPad 3: What we didn't get

Inevitably, whenever Apple releases a new product, there's a little disappointment over what was missing. Here's a look at some of the things Apple didn't deliver in this iPad release.

The new iPad will once again start at $499 for the 16GB version. For better or worse, the design really hasn't changed. Donald Bell/ CNET

The dust has finally settled, the rumors have been replaced by facts, and now we know what the new iPad is all about. So what's missing? Or what fell a little short of expectations?

Here's the quick rundown. Feel free to add to the mix with your own take in the comments section.

New design: When the iPhone 4S came out, a lot of folks were disappointed Apple didn't deliver the iPhone 5. Instead, we got a souped up version of the iPhone 4 with a better camera and no real design changes (Apple did move the ambient light sensor slightly, but that doesn't count).

Similarly, the "iPad 3"--Apple isn't calling it that--doesn't really look any different from the iPad 2. Yes, the case is slightly more tapered, but it's not a significant change. In other words, once again almost all the change is on the inside. For some people, that's just fine, but if you were hoping to see a whole new iPad with a new look, you'll have to wait.

Lighter weight: One of the issues with the iPad is that it remains a little heavy. Alas, with the new Retina display, better cameras, and faster processor, Apple couldn't reduce the weight of the device (it measures 9.4mm thin and weighs 1.44 pounds for the WiFi-only version). To get lighter, Apple would probably have to reduce the size of the battery, but that just wasn't possible in moving to the high-resolution display (Apple says battery life remains at 10 hours). As it stands, the new iPad weighs about an ounce more than the iPad 2.

An A6 processor: Prior to launch, there was lots of chatter about what kind of chip would power the next iPad. After the iPhone 4S got a modified version of the A5 processor found in the iPad 2, many presumed the new iPad would get the A6 processor. Instead we got the A5X, which integrates a dual-core processor with "quad-core" graphics.

Apple says the A5X offers "four times the performance" of Nvidia's Tegra 3 chip. Great as that all sounds, it's still no A6.

A 128GB version: Those holding out for a higher-capacity iPad will have to continue to wait. We're now looking at topping out at 64GB with no expansion slot.

A 7-incher (the rumored iPad Mini): While we thought the chances were slim that Apple would introduce a smaller iPad at this time, rumors continue to swirl that it will happen sometime this year. After the release of the Kindle Fire and Nook Tablet (both now cost $199), we'd like to see what Apple could do at this size. We'll have to wait.

Numbers game: The A5X is a dual-core processor with quad-core graphics. Apple

Siri: Everyone, including this writer, expected Apple to add Siri, the voice-controlled iPhone virtual assistant feature to the next iPad. So where is she? Interestingly, Apple said that new iPad will allow users to dictate e-mails, but didn't mention of Siri, who does more than take dictation.

iOS 6: Ars Technica reported that it was seeing devices running iOS 6 in logs, sparking hope that Apple might release--or at least tease--iOS 6. Alas, we're only getting iOS 5.1 now. Expect more iOS news to emerge in June at Apple's World Wide Developers conference.

No name: It looks like Apple's moving away from numbers in its iPad naming scheme like it did with the iPod Touch. For now it's just calling it "the new iPad," but when you actually order it through the Apple Store, what you see in your cart is "Apple iPad (3rd generation)." Perhaps this opens the door to other model names/versions such as the iPad Mini.

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