iOS 7, OS X banners spotted at WWDC preshow setup

Apple's said a new iOS and OS X will be shown off at WWDC next week. Banners hinting at both show up at the venue.

iOS 7's new logo, and tease at WWDC.
iOS 7's new logo, and tease at WWDC. MacStories

In case it wasn't clear that Apple planned to show off the next major version of iOS and OS X at next week's WWDC, there are now banners for both.

Spotted by MacStories on Friday, a very simple and minimal banner with colored "7" on it set against what looks much like the dotted aluminum found on the Mac Pro tower. Apple later put up one for OS X, which simply says "X" with a wave on it.

Apple typically keeps some banners hidden ahead of official announcements at WWDC, though had ones for major new versions of iOS and iCloud in recent years.

9to5Mac has also posted a handful of better photos of the banners, which have gone up in the entry area to Moscone West:

9to5Mac / Andrew Stern

Apple began decorating the venue for next week's show on Wednesday, wrapping the outside of the three story building with enormous Apple logos, and color banners. The annual conference is the company's largest event, and sold out in less than two minutes this year.

Monday's press conference, where the company has promised a first look at both pieces of software, kicks off at 10 a.m. PT. You can tune in to the live blog here:

CNET's live coverage of Apple's WWDC 2013 keynote

Update, at 12:14 p.m. PT:Notes the OS X banner going up as well.

Update at 1:30 p.m. PT: Here are some shots we snapped that show a closer view of the two (click to enlarge):

Josh Lowensohn/CNET

Josh Lowensohn/CNET
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