Iomega ships new NAS server for small businesses, schools

Iomega unveil its StorCenter ix4-200d network attached storage device that offers advanced features for small business and school environments.

Iomega

It's back-to-school time, and this is something students might get to use without having to pay for.

Iomega announced Thursday the worldwide availability of the quad-drive desktop NAS server, the Iomega StorCenter ix4-200d. EMC, the parent company of Iomega, simultaneously announced that as part of its Academic Alliance Program which has the participation of more than 300 universities and colleges around the world, each school will score a StorCenter ix4-200d NAS appliance.

The new NAS server--which is geared toward small businesses and home office environments--can support four SATA hard drives of up to 2TB each, making the combined storage amount up to 8TB. It supports RAID 5 and RAID 10 (a combination of RAID 1 and RAID 0) as well as JBOD and is said to be so easy to use you can get it up and running via a few mouse clicks.

Other features of the NAS server include:

  • iSCSI block-level access and device-to-device replication to network targets
  • Support for Windows Active Directory and up to 5 IP security cameras for video surveillance.
  • Support for Time Machine (available in Mac OS X 10.5 or later) and multiple media streaming standards
  • Dual-gigabit connection and three USB ports for adding extra storage and printers.
  • Remote access and management
  • Front panel LCD and QuikTransfer button for easy one-touch copying of selected files
  • VMware certification for virtualization installations

Accompanying the new NAS server, Iomega offers two backup software suites, including the EMC Retrospect and Iomega QuikProtect. These backup softwares offer a variety of backup solution for both desktop and laptop computers.

The new StorCenter ix4-200d is available now with a starting price of $700 for the 2TB version and $1,900 for the 8TB version.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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