Iomega 4-bay NAS server gets cloud service

Iomega announces upcoming 4-bay NAS server, the ix4-200D, that supports the company's Personal Cloud feature.

The ix4-200d NAS server from Iomega.
The ix4-200d NAS server from Iomega. Iomega

Together with cloud editions of the single-volume Home Media Network and dual-bay StorCenter ix2-200 , Iomega announced today that it's going to add its new Personal Cloud feature to its flagship 4-bay NAS server, the ix4-200d Cloud Edition.

Unlike the first two that will be available later this month, the ix4-200d Cloud Edition won't ship until March.

The ix4-200d Cloud Edition is very similar to its dual-bay brother but differentiates itself by offering more storage (up to 12TB); more RAID configurations (RAID 0, RAID 1, and RAID 5); and two Gigabit ports for more consistent performance during heavy loads.

As an NAS made specifically for business environments, the ix4-200d offers UPS support, device-to-device replication, Active Directory support, and a user-serviceable hard-drive-bay design. When configured in RAID 5 setup, the server's hard drives can be replaced without an interruption in service (hot-swappable) as long as only one fails at a time.

Other than that, it also supports print serving, user quotas, remote access features that are included in the Personal Cloud service, and many other features found in all Iomega NAS servers.

When available, the ix4-200d Cloud Edition will cost $830 for the 4TB version and $1,300 for the 8TB version. For now it's still unclear what the price of the 12TB version will be.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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