Introducing Dell's new Vostro line

Dell adds Vostro line to menu of laptops and desktops

Dell's new Vostro line Dell

It seems like a long time since Dell introduced a brand new line to its menu of laptops and desktops, instead of adding onto the current lineup of Inspiron, Latitude, and XPS systems (the long-lived Dimension line was finally retired in June).

Dell on Tuesday revealed an entirely new family of systems, called Vostro (Latin for "yours"), aimed at small businesses with 1-25 employees who need business-level systems that don't require full-time IT people to manage.

"For too long, entrepreneurs have been forced to fit either consumer or large corporate solutions into their unique environments," Dell Chairman and CEO Michael Dell said in a statement. In real-world terms, that means Vostro desktops and laptops won't include any of what Dell calls "trialware" (we call it "bloatware"), but will include simplified proprietary networking software and versions of the Dell PC Tune-Up and DataSafe Online programs found in the newest Inspiron systems. Vostro systems will also have a dedicated sales and support team, trained to work with small businesses.

Vostro systems available today include:

  • Notebooks: Vostro 1000 (AMD-based 15-inch for $449), Vostro 1400, 1500 and 1700 (14, 15, and 17-inch Core 2 Duo models, starting at $549 to $799)
  • Desktops: Vostro 200 mini-tower or slim-sized case, Intel-based, and starting at $319


    Hardware-wise, these new systems don't differ much from the current Dell lineup (but Dell expects to introduce a high-end Vostro desktop in August), and the online support and backup services are apparently only free for the first year, but in principle, we like the idea of a line that falls somewhere between consumer systems and systems aimed at larger businesses, which are expected to have at least some basic IT infrastructure.

  • About the author

    Dan Ackerman leads CNET's coverage of laptops, desktops, and Windows tablets, while also writing about games, gadgets, and other topics. A former radio DJ and member of Mensa, he's written about music and technology for more than 15 years, appearing in publications including Spin, Blender, and Men's Journal.

     

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