Intel: one of the open-source "good guys"

Intel does a heck of a lot of exceptional open-source work...and takes very little credit.

John Mark notes something that most of us forget: one of the world's most active and most interesting open-source contributors is not normally thought of as a software company at all: Intel. Intel does a huge amount of foundational work in the open-source community, yet takes very little credit for it.

Why is Intel so humble when it comes to its open source work?

I asked Dirk about making more noise about Intel's Open Source efforts. He mentioned the fantastic relationships that they have with so many Open Source projects, and that it's not in Intel's interest to screw them up - and the last thing they want to do is make the developers feel that they're doing Intel's bidding.

Makes sense, but I'm with John Mark: Intel should trumpet its good deeds a bit more. For one thing, they show that big vendors are not all completely mercenary when it comes to open-source involvement. Some big vendors are genuinely "good guys," even though it's for their own commercial ends.

Intel's latest and greatest project, by the way, is very cool: the Less Watts project, which is aimed at lowering Linux system power consumption. Nice.

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About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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