Impressions of NBA All-Star Saturday Night 2009 in 3D

All-Star Saturday Night 2009 in 3D

What do you get when TNT, the NBA, and Cinedigm come together? A movie theater experience unlike anything you've ever had before.

All-Star Saturday Night 2009 3D was shown in approximately 80 movie theaters around the United States and Canada. It showcased the Sprite Slam Dunk contest, the Foot Locker Three-Point Shootout, the Haier Shooting Stars, and the PlayStation Skills Challenge.

NBA action in high-definition on a huge movie theater screen in 3D is little piece of heaven. But I have to say I was a little skeptic at first, there was a quick screen freeze at the beginning of the broadcast that lasted about two seconds. It was very similar to the screen freeze you see from digital cable and satellite service. All I thought at this point was please don't let this happen at a critical time during the event (slam dunk contest). The screen froze again shortly after, and it never occurred again.

It was so clear you could see the smudged areas on the fiberglass backboards. During performances and announcements you felt like you were right there on the court/stage. So much so when people stepped in front of the camera it was like someone stepped in front of you. The best looking event in my opinion was the slam dunk contest. At certain replay angles you felt like you could block the dunk or catch the alley-oop.

As for commercial interruptions, there were a few. But they were only NBA, TNT, and Cinedigm advertisements; not as much as a televised broadcast, nor as long. For the most part you got to see the floor shows that take place as if you actually attended the event, giving you that at-the-game atmosphere.

For the first time, I was in a theater and I could talk to the people around me and send text messages from my cell phone and no one had a problem with it. I must say the energy there had an arena feel to it.

Tags:
Tech Culture
About the author

    When not juggling the dual demands of parenthood and playing basketball, Joseph is a life-long Manhattanite who can be found testing the latest tech in the CNET Labs and developing new benchmarks and testing methodologies.

     

    Join the discussion

    Conversation powered by Livefyre

    Don't Miss
    Hot Products
    Trending on CNET

    HOT ON CNET

    Up for a challenge?

    Put yourself to the real tech test by building your own virtual-reality headset with a few household items.