If Twitter weren't bad enough, now there's open-source Twoorl

Open source isn't a panacea: It can't take bad ideas and magically turn them into good ideas, any more than it can take bad code and magically turn it into good code. But it can enable smart people to turn the basic Twitter idea, using Twoorl, int

So, less than .0000000000000000001 percent of the world uses Twitter. Even fewer get any value from it. (Note: I am not among that group.)

Now, to make it even more obscure, there's a new, open-source Twitter called Twoorl. I have nothing against Twoorl (other than its a clone of a service that I already dislike), but given how narrow the Twitter network is already, Twoorl's will be even smaller.

With that said, at least now someone will be able to tweak the source code to turn Twitter into something useful. Like how about a better way to contact someone other than "@mjasay: Aren't eggs in the morning great?"

Open source isn't a panacea: It can't take bad ideas and magically turn them into good ideas, any more than it can take bad code and magically turn it into good code. But it can enable smart people to turn the basic Twitter idea, using Twoorl, into something useful. Like a way for me to keep tabs on my kids, or narrow my audience for certain "tweets," etc.

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About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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