IE team pokes fun at rapid-release Firefox 6

Microsoft's browser team apparently concludes the smaller set of new features in Firefox 6 warrants a smaller congratulatory cake.

To congratulate Mozilla on shipping Firefox 6, Microsoft sent a mere cupcake rather than a full cake, a little ribbing over the fact that new versions of Firefox arrive more frequently but with a smaller set of new features.
To congratulate Mozilla on shipping Firefox 6, Microsoft sent a mere cupcake rather than a full cake, a little ribbing over the fact that new versions of Firefox arrive more frequently but with a smaller set of new features. Jonathan Nightingale

Matching Firefox's new rapid-release development cycle, Microsoft's Internet Explorer team has downsized the traditional congratulatory cake it sends to its browser rival.

The new cake arrived last week to Mozilla upon shipment of Firefox 6. Jonathan Nightingale, director of Firefox engineering for Mozilla, posted a photo of the cake on Flickr.

Under the rapid-release program, new versions of the browser ship every six weeks, which means the change in features from the earlier version is correspondingly smaller. No doubt Microsoft--which is still using the big-change, infrequent-update approach with IE--was poking fun at the new release philosophy when it sent the diminutive cake.

The first IE cake I noticed was for shipping Firefox 3 in 2008, but there have been others since then. Each bears the same message: "Congratulations on shipping. Love, the IE Team."

In looking back over the history, though, I noticed that Firefox 5--which gave an early taste of the rapid-release program when it arrived three months after Firefox 4 --also received a cupcake. Evidently shrinking the congratulatory baked goods already is the new tradition.

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments