IBM Recommends Windows XP

IBM and Lenovo have nice things to say about Windows XP

If you shop online for a new Windows computer, every manufacturer recommends Vista on their web site. For home use they all suggest Vista Home Premium, for business use, Vista Business gets the nod. All the manufacturers sell other versions of Vista of course, most if not all sell Windows XP too, yet their websites universally recommend Vista Home Premium or Business.

Except IBM.

Yes, IBM no longer plays in this game. Back in 2005, IBM sold their personal computer division to Lenovo.

However, IBM still sells their old notebook and desktop computers, albeit as "IBM Certified Used Equipment".


As shown in the screen shot above, IBM recommends Windows XP Professional for their refurbished computers. Most of the personal computers (they also sell refurbished servers) are, in fact, running XP Professional, though a handful are running Vista.

Why is IBM the lone wolf?

A cynic might say that since most of their refurbs are running Windows XP, it's marketing. Or perhaps the web page in question simply hasn't been updated in over a year. IBM has no love for Microsoft, so maybe it's just a cheap shot.

But, could it be that since they are no longer in the personal computer business they can offer an honest opinion? After all, in August Lenovo decided to go with Windows XP rather than Vista for the upcoming 2008 Olympics. Quoting Computerworld (Vista, wireless sidelined from core Olympic IT roster):

"Windows XP was chosen to run on all PCs handling chores vital to the Olympic Games and has been installed on most of the PCs delivered by Lenovo Group Ltd. Vista will be used only on PCs in Internet lounges set up for athletes to use during the games.

The Olympic Games require mature, stable technologies, said Yang Yuanqing, chairman of Lenovo, during a briefing in Beijing. The Olympic Games aren't a place to try new technologies because of the size and importance of the event, he said. Everything must work smoothly."

The man has a point.

See a summary of all my Defensive Computing postings.

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About the author

    Michael Horowitz wrote his first computer program in 1973 and has been a computer nerd ever since. He spent more than 20 years working in an IBM mainframe (MVS) environment. He has worked in the research and development group of a large Wall Street financial company, and has been a technical writer for a mainframe software company.

    He teaches a large range of self-developed classes, the underlying theme being Defensive Computing. Michael is an independent computer consultant, working with small businesses and the self-employed. He can be heard weekly on The Personal Computer Show on WBAI.

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