HzO looking to make splash with smartphone waterproofing

A company called HzO has new waterproof technology that can protect your mobile devices inside and out, and it could find its way into Apple and Samsung smartphones this year.

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According to a recent study , 19 percent of you have lost your smartphone due to a fatal meeting with the toilet. Putting aside the disturbing fact that some people can't part with their phone for a precious few moments, wouldn't it be nice not to worry about your mobile device, should it take a tumble into the commode or any other body of water?

Well, it could happen, and even better, it could happen this year.

A company called HzO developed a nanofilm waterproof coating that can protect your electronics from the perils of water, but it's a bit different from some of the other solutions out there, such as NeverWet and Liquipel .

The difference is that HzO's WaterBlock is applied during the manufacturing stage instead of after, so it safeguards the insides of your phone, tablet, or MP3 player--and not just the outside. The company uses what it calls a vacuum deposition process to apply the protective film at room temperature, so at no point is heat--which can damage a device's circuitry--introduced during the process.

HzO says it already has a system for applying WaterBlock to a high volume of units and adds that it's made from nontoxic, organic material that doesn't change the look, feel, or weight of a device. However, the product isn't meant to make your smartphone dive- or swim-friendly. Rather, it's designed to ensure that your favorite gadget keeps on ticking, in case it goes for a dip in the pool.

The company has already tested WaterBlock on a number of smartphones and tablets, including the Apple iPhone 4S, the Samsung Galaxy S II, the Amazon Kindle Fire , and the Apple iPad.

HzO told Pocket-lint that the company is in talks with Samsung and Apple, as well as a company that makes headphones, to possibly manufacture their devices with the technology.

HzO President Paul Clayson said he expects to see WaterBlock-treated consumer devices this summer and plans to expand its use to other electronics, including cameras, solid-state laptops, medical equipment, and gaming devices.

(Via Los Angeles Times)

 

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