HP recalls 6M laptop power cords for 'fire and burn hazard'

Those power cords that connect to Compaq notebooks, mini notebook computers, and certain accessories can overheat and cause burns or property damage.

Hewlett-Packard has issued a recall on its LS-15 power cord that's used with Compaq laptops and other devices. Hewlett-Packard

Hewlett-Packard announced a voluntary worldwide recall of more than 6 million of its power cords because of overheating and potential "fire and burn hazard." These cords connect to the company's Compaq notebooks, mini notebook computers, and various AC adapter-powered accessories, like docking stations.

The power cord in question is called the LS-15. It's black and has a "LS-15" molded mark on the AC adapter end. These power cords came with HP laptops and accessories from September 2010 to June 2012. However, not all HP and Compaq notebook and mini notebook PCs were sold with the LS-15.

"HP has received 29 reports of power cords overheating and melting or charring resulting in two claims of minor burns and 13 claims of minor property damage," reads a statement posted to the US Consumer Product Safety Commission.

This isn't the first time HP had to recall power cords. In 2013, the HP Chromebook 11 was pulled from shop shelves after Google and HP admitted the charger was prone to overheating. HP notebook batteries have also been recalled after incidents of overheating resulting in injury and property damage.

HP advises that customers who own the LS-15 power cords stop using them immediately and contact the company for a free replacement. The customers most affected are in the US and Canada.

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