HP offers free apps to TouchPad tablet owners

Hewlett-Packard created a small sensation with the fire sale of its TouchPad tablet. Now it's adding to the appeal of a $100 tablet with an offer of free apps.

Glimpse multitasking app
Glimpse multitasking app

Hewlett-Packard isn't stopping at the deeply discounted $100 TouchPad tablet--it's throwing in free apps too.

The TouchPad has become a mini-sensation after HP began unloading the WebOS-based device last Friday for as little as $100. In fact, the TouchPad has the distinction of being the only tablet outside of Apple's iPad to generate long lines at stores.

And HP is sweetening the deal. "If you have an HP TouchPad...We've selected six apps that normally sell for as much as $14.99 and we're making them available at no cost to HP WebOS customers for a limited time," HP said on its Palm Web site today. The promo codes below will expire on August 31, the company said.

Without further ado, here's a sampling:

  • Multitasking: Glimpse (Inglorious Apps): boosts multitasking with split-screen interface.
  • Camera for TouchPad: (Keen Studios): options for managing photos and using them with other TouchPad apps.
  • Bird Guide: (Green Mountain Digital): searchable digital field guide to North American birds offers photographs and bird songs.
  • Game: Big Boss (Fair Play Labs): featuring heroes and wizards of WackyLands.

In a related development, an unboxing of a 64GB, 1.5GHz Touchpad has emerged. This was a high-end 4G model--the standard model is black with a 1.2GHz processor--that HP and AT&T had announced back in July but was never shipped. Until now.

The white 64GB TouchPad is an extremely rare SKU of a product that is already practically impossible to get.

There is a glimmer of hope, though. HP held out the possibility that more TouchPads would be shipped from warehouses . So far that hasn't happened, however.

About the author

Brooke Crothers writes about mobile computer systems, including laptops, tablets, smartphones: how they define the computing experience and the hardware that makes them tick. He has served as an editor at large at CNET News and a contributing reporter to The New York Times' Bits and Technology sections. His interest in things small began when living in Tokyo in a very small apartment for a very long time.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Still taking notes with pen and paper?

Bump up your grades and school supplies with these laptops, desktops, and tablets!