HP Linux group tries again with "OSLO" name

Fashionistas are wise to hang onto their duds: Today's passe clothing style is tomorrow's retro chic. Hewlett-Packard now has demonstrated that marketing labels also can make a comeback.

The company announced Wednesday it's renamed its HP Linux group the Open Source and Linux Organization (OSLO). "This further signifies HP's continued focus on open source beyond the Linux operating system," the company said in a statement.

Fair enough. But those who've watched the company might get a chuckle out of the move.

When HP launched the group in 1999, it also was called OSSO--the Open Source Solutions Operation. Then in 2000, it renamed itself the Open Source and Linux Operation. After a stint as just HP Linux, the OSLO name is back, though this time the final O stands for organization.

There is some substance beneath the flash, though. The group employs 100 Linux programmers, has certified more than 300 products with open-source products, has released more than 300 open-source printer drivers and has 34 response centers to deal with customers' open-source issues.

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About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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