How the Galaxy Note changed the smartphone status quo

One trend defines the last few years of smartphone tech -- a rapid increase in size. Adventures in Tech takes a laser-focused look at the device that kicked off the big-screen revolution.

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Phones today are enormous -- gigantic slabs of glass that only just squeeze into our pockets. More than any other, one device pioneered the bigger-is-better phone philosophy. Hit play to see how Samsung's Galaxy Note changed the smartphone status quo.

In the latest episode of CNET's Adventures in Tech, you'll also learn about why so-called "phablets" have proved so popular, as well as the scepticism that surrounded the unveiling of the first Galaxy Note, way back in 2011.

Despite that scepticism, big phones have become the norm, with even Apple rumoured to give in to the demand for larger screens, and make the iPhone 6 its biggest smartphone yet.

What do you think of the Galaxy Note and other massive mobiles? Is bigger really better, or do you yearn for the days of more pocketable gadgetry? Press play now, then tell me your thoughts in the comments, on our Facebook wall, or let me know on Twitter.

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About the author

Luke Westaway is a senior editor at CNET and writer/ presenter of Adventures in Tech, a thrilling gadget show produced in our London office. Luke's focus is on keeping you in the loop with a mix of video, features, expert opinion and analysis.

 

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