Hot Tub Boats to give Seattle folks scenic soaks

Talk about sitting in the sizzling lap of luxury. Floating hot tubs let you take in the city scenery while you lounge. Hopefully the prices will be cool.

A Hot Tub Boat makes its maiden voyage on Seattle's Lake Union. Why does Seattle get to have all the fun? Hot Tub Boats

After a stunning mid-70s yesterday here in the San Francisco Bay Area, today brought back the chill. Which makes the idea of a hot tub sound mighty appealing right about now.

You know what sounds even more appealing though? Soaking in a hot tub while bobbing around the bay gazing upon sights like the Golden Gate Bridge and Transamerica Pyramid.

If these new Hot Tub Boats float their way south from Seattle anytime soon, we shivering Bay Areans might actually be able to enjoy a super-scenic soak. The creators of the Hot Tub Boats say they plan to build a fleet of four to be available for rent on Seattle's Lake Union by the end of summer. We can only hope the concept takes off and the watercraft steer their way to other parts of the county too.

These feet look very happy, do they not? Hot Tub Boats

The boats, which are powered by inboard motors, can be driven while lounging in the tub or maneuvered via mechanical and/or remote steering and throttle while seated on the aft deck. "Don't worry, [driving] is easy, especially after a quick tutorial from our friendly and approachable staff," the Web site reassures us.

They accommodate six passengers and measure 15 feet long by 16 feet wide (with the all-important tub itself measuring 4 feet by 8 feet and 2 feet deep).

The purveyors of Hot Tub Boats won't yet say how much float-and-soak time costs (we're a bit nervous to hear this detail), but say they're currently taking names for a reservation log.

As for attire, "we ask that you please wear appropriate swim attire, whatever that means to you," the Web site says. Which means this R2-D2 swimsuit should be totally fine.

About the author

Leslie Katz, Crave's senior editor, heads up a team that covers the most crushworthy (and wackiest) tech, science, and culture around. As a co-host of the now-retired CNET News Daily Podcast, she was sometimes known to channel Terry Gross and still uses her trained "podcast voice" to bully the speech recognition software on automated customer service lines. E-mail Leslie.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Last minute back to school shopping?

Whether you're looking for headphones to study with or music-streaming gear, CNET rounds up a shopping guide just for you.