Honey, I shrunk the Corsair Flash Voyager

The popular Corsair's Flash Voyager is now available in mini size.

The all new 4GB Flash Voyager Mini from Cosair. Cosair

I've accidentally left my thumdrives in the pocket and let them go through the laundry treatment multiple times. Some times they survived, other times I had to buy a new one. Either way, I had to deal with this familiar lingering bad feeling after finding the little device inside the dryer. It's like "Gosh, I couldn't believe it happened, again!" And yet, I just can't guarantee that it won't. This is why I've been very happy with Cosair's Flash Voyager series that features a water resistance and shockproof housing.

Mishaps-proof, the tiny Voyager Mini is about as light as a piece of gum. Cosair

And today, the device got a new form factor. It's now has is ultra compact with a size that's about one third of the original Flash Voyager. The all-new Flash Voyager Minioffers 4GB of storage and weight just 0.2 ounces (about as heavy as a piece of gum). Like other Flash Voyager flash drives, the Mini is covered in rubber and is water and shock resistant.

The Flash Voyager Mini features a cap-less retractable connector plug, which easily opens with the flick of the thumb (and protects the chip inside while closed). It utilizes the latest chip-on-board technology, which allows the entire USB connector to be easily retracted into the drive. The new design makes the drive smaller and also helps prevent it from damage caused by daily life mishaps.

You can buy the new drive right nowfor about $25, which is rather expensive considering the relatively small amount of storage space. I believe the price will go down in the near future. Nonetheless, Corsair backs it up with 10 year limited warranty. I think it's worth the current price, if you want something really tiny and--more importantly--negligence-proof. Speaking of which, I know I am going to get myself one.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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