Hitachi intros first 7,200rpm, single-platter 7mm hard drive

Hitachi says its new 2.5-inch hard drives are thinner, more rugged, and faster.

The new Travelstar Z7K500 hard drive from Hitachi.
The new Travelstar Z7K500 hard drive from Hitachi. Hitachi

Hitachi GST announced today that it's now shipping the Travelstar Z7K500 hard drive. The company says this is the first low-profile (7mm) 2.5-inch hard drive that spins at 7,200rpm, supports SATA 3 (6Gbps), features 32MB of cache, and can handle shock up to 400G.

The new drive uses only one platter and offers up to 500GB, meaning it has a data density of 626 gigabits per square inch. Despite being much thinner, the Z7K500 drive supports standard power and data connectors and can replace existing 9.5mm standard 2.5-inch hard drives, as well as working in thin and light products, such as Intel's new ultrabook .

According to Hitachi, the new 7,200rpm Travelstar Z7K500 delivers up to 33 percent more performance than other 2.5-inch hard drives on the market. The drive also uses just 1.8 watts of read/write power and 0.8 watt low-power idle and operates nearly silently.

The new ultrathin Travelstar Z7K500 hard drive (left) and a standard 9.5mm, 2.5-inch hard drive.
The new ultrathin Travelstar Z7K500 hard drive (left) and a standard 9.5mm, 2.5-inch hard drive. Hitachi

The Travelstar Z7K500 drive comes in 500GB, 320GB, and 250GB capacities and will be available for consumers in March. It's currently unclear how much it costs.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Delete your photos by mistake?

Whether you've deleted everything on your memory card or there's been a data corruption, here's a way to recover those photos.