Help, I'm getting arrested!

Inspired by a real "Occupy Wall Street" incident, the I'm Getting Arrested app for Android instantly notifies loved ones of your situation.

Imagine you're in New York (or perhaps another major metropolitan city) peacefully protesting.

Your cause? Let's say, to curb excessive influence of big business and the wealthiest 1 percent of Americans on U.S. laws and policy. You're holding up a sign declaring your heartfelt beliefs and chanting a bit with some of your fellow demonstrators when, all of a sudden--bam! The cops slap the cuffs on you, with the intention of carting you off to the nearest police station. Meanwhile, your friends and family are at home completely clueless about your situation.

Enter I'm Getting Arrested, a creative Android app that, according to developer Quadrant 2, was inspired by a similar incident. It lets you quickly notify your family, friends, and crack legal team (if you have one) of your situation with a single tap of your finger. Just initially enter a custom message and some SMS-ready numbers to contact in the event of your arrest. Then, as you're about to be corralled into the back of a squad car, fire the app up and long-press the bull's-eye for 2 seconds. From there, you can rest assured that your message will be sent to the appropriate contacts.

Quadrant 2

From what we've seen, I'm Getting Arrested is straightforward and works exactly as described. Our only question is, why no Twitter or Facebook support? Considering we're talking about a grassroots movement here, it just makes sense, no? Built-in social media would not only expand the app's reach to potentially large numbers of friends and loved ones, but it would also serve as a bullhorn for rallying support after every arrest.

I'm Getting Arrested is available for free download now in the Android Market. And for supporters of the Occupy Wall Street movement, you might want to download it before October 15. Just saying.

About the author

Jaymar Cabebe covers mobile apps and Windows software for CNET. While he may be a former host of the Android Atlas Weekly podcast, he doesn't hate iOS or Mac. Jaymar has worked in online media since 2007.

 

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