Helix Wind to acquire Venco for $3.9 million

With Venco comes greater access to the residential market in Europe and three new products that Helix plans to add to its small wind product line.

Twister 300-T
Twister 1000-T
Vertikon H50 Venco

Helix Wind has signed a definitive purchase agreement to acquire Venco Power, a Germany-based manufacturer of vertical axis small wind turbines, for $3.9 million in cash and common stock, the company announced Thursday.

With Venco comes greater access to the small wind residential market in Europe, along with three new products the company plans to add to its small wind product line, according to Helix Wind CEO Ian Gardner.

While all three models are for the small wind market, each has a distinctive look and different capacities. The Venco Twister 300-T produces power at wind speeds as low as 3.5 meters per second (7.8 mph); it starts rotating at 3.0 meters per second, and its claim to fame is that it's "virtually quiet." The Twister 1000-T makes the same noise and power claims as the 300-T, but has a different look and begins to start rotating at a wind speed of 1.5 meters per second. The Vertikon H50 will begin generating power at speeds as low as 2.5 meters per second.

Venco also has an online calculator (for Java applet-friendly browsers) for estimating how much power one can expect each particular turbine product to generate. Potential customers input average wind speeds for each month of the year at their location, and can change which turbine the figures are applied to.

"We're also excited to bring German engineering talent and technology to the quest for alternative energy," Gardner said in a statement.

The news follows Helix Wind's August announcement offering a unique financial fix for the initial cash outlay that residential customers and dealers face when getting into wind power.

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In a software-driven world, it's easy to forget about the nuts and bolts. Whether it's cars, robots, personal gadgetry or industrial machines, Candace Lombardi examines the moving parts that keep our world rotating. A journalist who divides her time between the United States and the United Kingdom, Lombardi has written about technology for the sites of The New York Times, CNET, USA Today, MSN, ZDNet, Silicon.com, and GameSpot. She is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not a current employee of CNET.

 

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