Greenpeace: HP up, Apple down in green ranks

In the latest green report, Greenpeace indicated gaps between PC vendors in phasing out the use of toxic substances.

Apple is no longer ranked the greenest among PC makers.
Apple is no longer ranked the greenest among PC makers. Screenshot by Dong Ngo/CNET

In its latest Guide to Greener Electronics, released today, Greenpeace points to some significant changes among computer makers in keeping it clean.

Apple's ranking, for example, has dropped, from fifth place to ninth. More than a year ago, Apple was ranked the highest among computer makers , being the company that used the fewest toxic substances in making its products.

Apple's drop in the ratings, however, doesn't mean the company has been lacking in staying clean and green; but more because it didn't provide the public enough information about its future toxic chemical phase-out plans and the fact that other PC makers have showed significant improvements.

HP, for instance, jumped from being among the worst a year ago to having better ranking than Apple, climbing from eighth place to fourth. Dell, despite losing a point for failing to meet the promise of phasing out toxic substances, now has the same score as Apple. 

Unfortunately, unlike Dell and HP, Lenovo, Toshiba, and especially Microsoft are still far behind in keeping their promises and commitments to remove toxic substances.

The toxic substances in questions are mainly vinyl plastic (widely known as PVC) and brominated flame retardants (BFRs), which are not biodegradable and harmful for the environment.

Greenpeace credited Philips in this latest report for releasing the first PVC- and BFRs-free TV, the Econova, which puts Philips on track to meet its commitment to phase out these hazardous substances by the end the year, ahead of other TV manufacturers.

Among all makers of electronics, Nokia and Sony Ericsson remain the greenest by a larger margin. The two have been making products that are free of most hazardous substances, including PVC/BFRs, antimony, beryllium, and phthlates.

The complete ranking page of the current Guide to Greener Electronics can be found here.


About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews 3D printers, networking/storage devices, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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