Google's Flight Search goes international

The tool for searching and booking flights now reaches beyond the United States--as long as the flight originates there.

Google Flight Search now lets people search and book flights originating in the United States but arriving in other countries.
Google Flight Search now lets people search and book flights originating in the United States but arriving in other countries. screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Google Flight Search, a fare-finding utility that riled up parts of the airline industry , has broadened its reach beyond the United States.

Previously, the tool was for flights within the U.S. Now international destinations are an option, according to a blog post today from product manager Eric Zimmerman.

"At this stage we've included more than 500 airports outside the U.S.," Zimmerman said. "If your ideal destination isn't yet available, we're working hard on expanding our global coverage and adding more routes in the future. Our goal is to make booking travel as fast and enjoyable as possible."

There's a big caveat here, though. The service only includes international destinations if you're starting from the United States. So it remains fundamentally a U.S-based service.

The service is the result of Google's $700 million acquisition of ITA Software . The tool lets people search for flights and use graphical tools to pick the most economical options by adjusting dates, for example. See the screenshot below.

Google Flight Search presents graphical tools to see the array of prices and to fiddle with the cheapest dates to fly.
Google Flight Search presents graphical tools to see the array of prices and to fiddle with the cheapest dates to fly. Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET
About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Find Your Tech Type

Take our tech personality quiz and enter for a chance to win* high-tech specs!