Google's Cesar Chavez doodle controversy: Much adoodle about nothing?

Some get upset about Google celebrating a labor activist and all around good Christian on Easter Sunday. But where were they last Easter, when there was no doodle at all?

Not so leftie that they still don't want to sell Chrome. Screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Those venal, vegetable-munching lefties at Google have struck again.

Just when they should have been doodling away to celebrate a religious festival of bunnies, colorful eggs, and lots and lots of chocolate, they go and place a large picture of recently deceased venal, leftie Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez on the home page.

At least, that's what certain irate and passionate humans thought when they raised their objections about Google's Easter doodle celebrating labor activist and very devout Christian, Cesar Chavez.

Their passions overflowed to such an extreme that some even threatened to perform acts of unspeakable shame and treachery. Yes, they shook their fists and claimed they would desert to Bing.

Clearly, Google was entirely unprepared for this onslaught of fire and loathing.

All of its previous Easter doodles have been such blissful, traditional and religious affairs. Yes, all of them have featured Easter eggs.

That would be all one of them, as far as I can see.

I tried performing a Google search for an Easter doodle, and found one lone outlier, in 2000.

This couldn't be true. There had to have been an Easter doodle last year, otherwise the whole world would have risen in ire and brimstone.

There would surely have been mouths foaming, hearts groaning and heads rolling.

So I searched all the doodles for 2012. Easter was April 8 last year. There was no doodle.

On April 9, however, there seem to have been two doodles -- one celebrating Elias Lonnrot and the other Eadweard J. Muybridge.

Both raving radicals, of course.

Still, why would Google choose today, of all days, to upset so many so obviously? Yes, it was Cesar Chavez's birthday.

Oh, and last year President Obama did happen to decree that March 31 would be known as Cesar Chavez Day. He asked all of America's citizens to "observe this day with appropriate service, community and education programs."

Today has, indeed, been an education.

Clearly Google's executives have been shaken to their hand-knitted sweaters (from Peru) by the accusation of an anti-religious bent.

The company issued a statement, captured by Business Insider, that read: "We enjoy celebrating holidays at Google, but, as you may imagine, it's difficult for us to choose which events to highlight on our site. Sometimes for a given date, we feature an historical event or influential figure that we haven't in the past."

It's about originality, you see, not religious observance.

Google, at heart, is proving over and over again that it's just an ad business. Sometimes, it's an innovative, quirky ad business. Sometimes, it's a deeply money-grabbing, people-ignorant, slightly arrogant ad business. (More often the latter, some would say.)

It's not, and never has been, a public service.

So if it decides to doodle Cesar Chavez, you have the choice to sing for Bing. Some will give unto Cesar what is Cesar's, others will give unto Bing what is Bing's.

I wonder how many of today's critics will actually follow through with their threats. My contacts in Vegas tell me that the over-under is 3,886.

 

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