Google unveils enterprise Search Appliance

New Google Search Appliance offers shortcuts to common questions across business applications.

Google on Wednesday unveiled two enterprise search products--a Google Search Appliance and a next-generation Google Mini--targeted at large enterprises and small organizations, respectively.
Google Mini
Google Mini

The Google Search Appliance integrates Google's OneBox technology that will allow companies to offer search shortcuts to commonly asked questions across their business applications, such as corporate contact directory, customer resource management and financial programs.

Pricing for the Google Search Appliance, which also has improved security and performance over the company's previous Search Appliance, starts at $30,000, Google said.

The Google OneBox for Enterprise includes functions developed with partners such as Cisco Systems, Cognos, NetSuite, Oracle, and SAS.

Cisco, for example, is integrating its MeetingPlace Express technology with Google's appliance, while Oracle is providing access to human resources, customer relationship management and enterprise resource planning applications via the Oracle E-Business suite.

Google Search Appliance
Google Search Appliance

Employease, another Google partner, will offer on-demand human resources information, ranging from employee data to benefits to recruitment and performance information.

Former PeopleSoft founder Dave Duffield had been in talks with Google to offer on-demand human resources technology, but those negotiations ultimately fell through, according to sources familiar with the company's plans. Duffield is currently gearing up launch Workday, an on-demand human resources company, as early as May.

Meanwhile, the new Google Mini is targeted at small businesses and is faster and half the size and weight of the original Mini. It costs just less than $2,000.

Google also is launching an enterprise developer program.

CNET's Dawn Kawamoto contributed to this report.

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