Google TV to get Howard Stern, Sirius XM

App expected to be available this summer will deliver satellite radio's programming to subscribers on the struggling Internet TV platform.

Howard Stern HowardStern.com

Google is hoping to give its foundering Google TV effort a jump start from shock jock Howard Stern.

Satellite radio provider Sirius XM told Reuters that it will make all of its programming available on Google TV through a new app that will allow listeners to pause live programs and play back up to five hours of content. Sirius XM is expected to announce the deal tomorrow at Google's I/O developers conference in San Francisco. (Update, June 27 at 7:25 a.m. PT: It's official: SiriusXM says it's coming soon to Google TV.)

The app, which is expected to launch this summer, cannot access programming without a Sirius XM subscription. But the app will present additional programming not available to the satellite radio's 22 million home and car subscribers, including a channel dedicated to the comedy of George Carlin.

Since renewing his contract with Sirius XM in 2010, Stern's program has been available only on Sirius XM app on various mobile platforms such as the Apple's iOS, Google's Android, and RIM's BlackBerry.

Google TV is one of the more high-profile attempts in recent history by the tech industry to marry the PC-based Internet and the traditional television world. Logitech and Sony have released devices running Google TV software, which allows people to watch regular old broadcast television while pulling up a series of Internet-based applications and Web sites.

However, Google TV has gotten off to a rocky start, and the search giant is still trying to get the big media companies to warm up to the software platform. So far, all of the major broadcast networks have blocked Google TV from providing access to their online content. However, Disney has said it will make a handful of its movies and TV shows available for rent through YouTube on Google TV.

Financial terms of the deal were not revealed, but a deal with Google is likely to go a long way toward helping pay off what's left of Stern's original $500 million contract as well as the new contract, which is estimated to be worth $400 million.

 

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