Google tablet confirmed by Asus representative, report says

The long-rumored Google tablet does exist, and it's going to launch by the end of the month, according to a new report.

Will the Google tablet look like this Asus-branded slate?
Will the Google tablet look like this Asus-branded slate? Nvidia

Google's long-rumored tablet, developed with help from Asus, is launching soon, according to a new report.

Android Authority is reporting today that it recently sat down with an "Asus representative" at Computex, who said that the co-branded Google tablet does, in fact, exist. What's more, the representative said that the Google tablet will launch at the end of June, seeming to indicate that the search giant's I/O conference could be home to the unveiling.

Rumors have been swirling for months that Google is looking to launch its own tablet at some point this summer. Some reports have suggested that the device would launch in June, while others claim July. The tablet is expected to come with a 7-inch screen, and according to a recently leaked benchmark, a 1.3GHz Nvidia Tegra 3 quad-core processor. Nvidia's ULP GeForce GPU is also expected to come bundled in the device.

According to Android Authority, the representative wouldn't divulge the Google tablet's pricing or availability. However, the person did offer some details on other Asus products launching soon, including the Padfone, which the representative says, will eventually come to the U.S. once carriers warm to it. The Asus Transformer Prime Infinity will launch at the end of the month in both Wi-Fi-only and LTE versions.

CNET has contacted Google for comment on the Android Authority report. We will update this story when we have more information.

Featured Video
This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.

Details about Apple's 'spaceship' campus from the drone pilot who flies over it

MyithZ has one of the most popular aerial photography channels on YouTube. With the exception of revealing his identity, he is an open book as he shares with CNET's Brian Tong the drone hardware he uses to capture flyover shots of the construction of Apple's new campus, which looks remarkably like an alien craft.

by Brian Tong