Google sells Nexus 4 wireless charger for $60

At long last, the pricey accessory pops up on Google's Play store.

Nexus 4 wireless charger
For $60, you can get your Nexus 4 wireless charging on. Google

Months after Google began selling the LG-made Nexus 4 Android 4.2 smartphone, it (finally) has a wireless charger to offer as well.

The charging accessory, available in the Google Play store, resembles a sheared-off Nexus Q and costs $59.99.

Google's wireless charger, like most, relies on the Qi protocol of inductive charging. The upshot is that the charger will be able to power other smartphones using the same standard.

I personally think this is a hefty sticker price for an add-on that's long been underscored as part of the Nexus 4's key selling points. Even so, Google's charge is in keeping with the accessories business. Nokia wireless charging cases for phones like the Lumia 820 cost around $20 (it's built into the Lumia 920 ), and you'll have to fork over between $50 (eBay) and $100 for the actual charging plate.

Part of the higher pricing owes to the fact that accessories like this, while practical, are also pitched as fashionable. You use a charger to hide the visible cables that can quickly clutter a desk, table, or counter. Yes, the charger plugs into the wall, but tuck in the cord and the surface you see just the orb, charging plate, or whichever form it takes.

It'll be interesting to see how efficiently the Qi-powered charger juices up the Nexus 4. In my experience with the Lumia 920, the phone charged only slightly slower than through the phone's charging port. I'll also admit that plopping the phone on the charging plate without worrying about the Micro-USB connection was convenient for quick power top-ups.

Are you on board with wireless charging, or do you find it unnecessary? Chime in below!

Read the full CNET Review

LG Nexus 4

The Bottom Line: While the LG Nexus 4 wins on internal performance and user experience, anyone shopping for an unlocked phone should consider a comparable LTE handset first. / Read full review

About the author

Jessica Dolcourt reviews smartphones and cell phones, covers handset news, and pens the monthly column Smartphones Unlocked. A senior editor, she started at CNET in 2006 and spent four years reviewing mobile and desktop software before taking on devices.

 

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