Google pays those who find Android security glitches

Those who pinpoint vulnerabilities in Google's mobile operating system can earn cash rewards, similar to those paid out for identifying bugs in Chrome.

Androids galore
Stephen Shankland/CNET

Google has expanded its bug-bounty program to cover vulnerabilities uncovered in Android.

The program began with Chrome and expanded to Google Web sites and other open-source software projects. Under the program, people who find security holes get paid bounties. That often equates to a few hundred dollars, but particularly skilled attacks can mean big money -- $50,000 last week for one expert who goes by the name Pinkie Pie, for example.

The broader expansion, called the Patch Reward Program, now includes Android, Google security team member Michal Zalewski said in a blog post Monday.

The program also includes three widely used Web server packages: Apache's http, Nginx, and Lighttpd, Zalewski said.

Via The Next Web

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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