Google map takes tourists to annoyed couple's home

People who happen to look on Google Maps for Round Valley Reservoir as opposed to Round Valley State Park in New Jersey discover soon enough that they'll arrive in the driveway of Laurie Gneiding and Michael Brady's home.

Some people might like the company.

Some, though, would declare that this is worse than having a telemarketer call you every three minutes.

Laurie Gneiding and Michael Brady might be among the latter, given that one of those little technical glitches in Google Maps brings many people to their door. They just happen to be people that Gneiding and Brady haven't invited to dinner. Or lunch. Or even a party.

The New Jersey Star-Ledger explained that Gneiding and Brady happen to live in a home that is very near to Round Valley State Park. Unfortunately, as far as Google Maps is concerned, they are Round Valley State Park, or at least Round Valley State Reservoir, which happens to be right in the middle of the state park.

It took a little time for the couple to realize this. The trickle of visitors has increased exponentially with Google's rise to prominence and dominance of people's minds.

It's a really nice reservoir. But it isn't in the couple's back garden. Honest. CC Sankar Govind/Flickr

Worse, it seems that the quality of visitors has descended far below the politeness of even members of Congress.

Some apparently use rude words and gestures, as if this is somehow Gneiding and Brady's fault. How could it be? They've lived there since 1987. They've even put up signs that politely explain that theirs is a private house not a public playground.

The couple tried to contact Google to plead with the company to redirect these tourist hordes away from their peaceful fiefdom. That was back in May. Come the July 4 weekend, the invasion bordered on the Viking-like.

So the Star-Ledger contacted Google, who promised a fix, but not necessarily a quick one. As always, Google appreciated the feedback, but don't Gneiding and Brady know that Google is trying to kill Apple and Facebook at the same time? Don't they realize the resources that have to be put behind such a 21st century war?

Naturally, Google didn't remotely phrase it that way. Instead, a representative reportedly told the Star-Ledger: "It often depends on the type of change and how extensive it might be."

Oh, come now, Googlies. If you can launch an assault on the world's two most powerful kingdoms, surely you can flip a switch or two to give Gneiding and Brady a little peace and quiet.

Perhaps the couple should leap onto Google+ and create a circle around the issue.

 

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