Google: Invite a friend to the Google Glass Explorer Program

Exclusive e-mails are sent to owners of the device's Explorer Edition allowing them the opportunity to invite one special friend to buy a Google Glass prototype.

A Google Glass prototype. Sarah Tew/CNET

The Google Glass proliferation is beginning. And, for those who want a piece of the action it's going to take knowing friends in high places.

Google started sending out e-mails to some of the owners of the Google Glass Explorer Edition on Tuesday saying that these select few were allowed to invite one friend to join the program, according to Marketing Land.

"We love sharing glass with our friends, because adventures through Glass are more fun with others," Google wrote in the e-mail. "Here's your chance to invite one friend into the Glass Explorer Program."

To be eligible for an invitation, friends of Explorer owners have to be at least 18 years old, live in the U.S., and be able to pick up the device in San Francisco, Los Angeles, or New York.

Google Glass is the company's foray into a wearable computer or smartphone . The device comes in the form of eyeglasses that can record videos, take photos, chat, get directions, look up facts on the Web, and more.

Google started shipping the $1,500 Explorer Edition prototypes in April and the device is expected to arrive on the market for the general public later this year.

When contacted by CNET a Google spokesperson confirmed the invites. "A small subset of Explorers received this," the spokesperson said. "It's not dissimilar to other ways we've been expanding the Explorer program through the Film School (announced today), or the University program announced a few weeks back."

Here is a copy of the e-mail via a Google+ post from Glass owner Ryan Mott:

Update, July 31 at 3:25 p.m. PT: Adds comment from Google spokesperson and clarifies description of Google Glass. Google does not consider Glass to be augmented reality, according to its FAQ page.

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About the author

Dara Kerr is a staff writer for CNET focused on the sharing economy and tech culture. She grew up in Colorado where she developed an affinity for collecting fool's gold and spirit animals.

 

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