Google Grab bag: Gmail limits and more

Steve McQueen's Bullitt on Google Maps; Gmail limits; Google ads in China; Google I/O videos, building a mobile community.

Here's a roundup of recent juicy Google tidbits:

• Amid general praise for Steve McQueen's famed car chase in the 1968 movie Bullitt, there are jeers about the recurring green VW Beetle and the geographic hash it makes of San Francisco. You might be amused to see this side-by-side view of the Bullitt chase and a Google map that shows just how much they jump from one patch of the city to another. (Via Google Maps Mania.)

Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif.
Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. Stephen Shankland/CNET News.com

• Ever wonder what the limits on Gmail activity are? Well, here's the answer, according to a Google Apps posting: "500 messages per day (i.e., you can hit 'Send' a maximum of 500 times); 500 unique recipients; 2,000 total e-mails (for example, you could send one message to a group of 500 people four times)."

• Google is advertising in China, just like they did in Russia. Google rarely takes out ads, but apparently in countries like China and Russia, where Baidu and Yandex , respectively, are more widely used than Google, the company is willing to think differently.

• Google is trying to build up discussions at a newly launched Google Mobile Community. "We envision this community as being a place where you can discuss the world of mobile in general...We also want the community to be a place where you can tell us what you think about our very own products," said Bret Luboyeski, a Google mobile product specialist, on the Google Mobile blog.

• Google said it extended its YouTube Partner Program to Germany and France. That means popular members in those countries can make ad money from their videos through the revenue-sharing program.

• Miss the Google I/O conference? All the Google I/O videos are online now on YouTube.

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Tech Culture
About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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