Google App Engine suffers outages

Vaunted facility for hosting Web applications has been experiencing problems. The company is "working hard" to track down the source and fix it.

One advantage of cloud computing is that it's an expert's job to keep the centralized computing infrastructure up and running. But even experts have problems, and that's what's going on Tuesday with Google's App Engine .

The service has been having outages Tuesday, according to a mailing list posting Tuesday. App Engine, launched in April and still in "preview release" mode, is a service that lets people create interactive Web applications written in the Python programming language.

"We've experienced several outages during the past 12 hours, the most recent of which started at 6:30 a.m. PDT and is still ongoing. During these outages, a significant percentage of requests resulted in errors. The errors are related to usage of the Datastore," the note said. "We're working hard to determine the cause of these outages and will continue updating as we make progress."

Google didn't immediately respond to a request for comment about the issue.

Update 5:25 p.m. PDT: Google fixed the problem, according to an update notice Google pointed out to me.

"At around 1:40 p.m. we were able to isolate the issue, and requests are currently serving normally," the update said. "This outage was the result of a bug in our datastore servers and was triggered by a particular class of queries. We have isolated the bug and we're currently working on a fix. Going forward, we're also working to further isolate queries so that in the future a bug like this won't affect the stability of the system as a whole."

(Via TechCrunch.)

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Is your phone battery always at 4 percent?

These battery packs will give your device the extra juice to power through all of those texts and phone calls.