Good OLPC info from Portelligent and EE Times

Portelligent president David Carey provides a quick rundown on the key components in the XO-1 from One Laptop Per Child in EE Times.

I just saw an interesting piece over on the EE Times website (here) written by David Carey, president of Portelligent, an analyst firm well-known for doing teardowns of popular electronic products.

The XO-1 laptop from the OLPC Foundation OLPC Foundation

Here are some of the key points I learned from the article:

According to Portelligent, the LCD is pretty similar to previous transflective LCDs (that is, LCDs that can work from transmitted backlight or reflected ambient light) except for the arrangement of the color subpixels. I've seen nothing particularly remarkable about mine. It offers poor off-axis image quality, as I described in my first look ( here ), and doesn't even work as well as the transflective LCD on my Sony DSC-T1 digital camera, which displays color in reflective mode. The XO-1's display may be more power-efficient than previous transflective displays, but Carey doesn't report information on that point in this article.

Portelligent did report whole-system power figures, though, seeing 6W to 7W of power consumption during "full-tilt operation," whatever that means, exactly. In my own brief tests I saw power consumption in the range of 4W to 5W when the machine was doing almost nothing. Any machine with such a narrow range of power consumption isn't exhibiting good power management.

Carey's article (and a great illustration, here) goes on to provide some good information about the specific chips found in the unit they took apart. The article is also an advertisement for a full report Portelligent sells with all the details of the teardown, but I don't mind that at all in cases like this where the free article stands on its own.

Tags:
Tech Culture
About the author

    Peter N. Glaskowsky is a computer architect in Silicon Valley and a technology analyst for the Envisioneering Group. He has designed chip- and board-level products in the defense and computer industries, managed design teams, and served as editor in chief of the industry newsletter "Microprocessor Report." He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. Disclosure.

     

    Join the discussion

    Conversation powered by Livefyre

    Show Comments Hide Comments
    Latest Galleries from CNET
    The best tech products of 2014
    Does this Wi-Fi-enabled doorbell Ring true? (pictures)
    Seven tips for securing your Facebook account
    The best 3D-printing projects of 2014 (pictures)
    15 crazy old phones from a Korean museum (pictures)
    10 gloriously geeky highlights from 2014 (pictures)