Golden Goose scrambles eggs in the shell

Shake it up. A low-tech kitchen gadget on Kickstarter simplifies the process of creating an in-shell golden egg.

Get ready to lay some golden eggs. Y Line Product Design

I first heard about golden eggs a couple nights ago when the topic came up in a conversation among friends. The idea is to whip around a raw egg around so fast it gets scrambled right in the shell. Then, you hard boil it and eat it in all its mixed-up yellowish glory.

It sounds like a delicious novelty, but the creation method described to me involves taking an old t-shirt, rolling the egg up in it, and flipping it around until it scrambles. I envisioned trying this. I then envisioned disaster as the shirt unfurls and flings a raw egg at high speed into the wall.

I was afraid, but I still wanted to try this alleged delicacy. So, I went online and found Kickstarter had already divined my thoughts and was offering up the Golden Goose project, a kitchen gadget designed to safely scramble your eggs without breaking the shell.

The hand-powered device holds a single egg in a container in the center with two handles attached by nylon cords to either end. Pulling on the handles spins the egg rapidly, alternating directions for a thorough internal scrambling. You may be familiar with a Victorian-era spinning toy that works in pretty much the same way.

The Golden Goose is not too far off its $34,500 funding goal with 21 days left in the campaign. The gadget costs a $24 pledge. Once you've gilded your eggs, your options are pretty wide open, from soft boiling to making some really weird-looking deviled eggs.

Sure, there are DIY ways to make a golden egg, but if you're a fan of kitchen gadgets, then the Golden Goose is certainly an entertaining way to whip up a snack.

This is what a golden egg looks like after it's cooked. Y Line Product Design

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