Gizmoz rolls out new face-mapping video service

Put your face in various video clips with Gizmoz's be a star service.

We're total suckers for video products that let us use our face. A few months back, Caroline put my head on a woman's body with the launch of JibJab's Starring You service, and shortly before that, Rafe played around with Fix8, which lets you overlay live video with avatar and object overlays. Both are vastly different technologies, but the idea is the same: quick entertainment with very little effort on the part of the end user. Along the same lines, Gizmoz, which has been providing 3-D face-mapping technology to the masses since late May, is launching a new product this morning called "be a star."

Be a star is essentially a really simple way to insert yourself into a variety of clips from TV shows, movies, and music videos. Using the same technology found in its basic talking avatar service, Gizmoz will take any photo of someone's face you throw at it, and convert it into a 3-D head that's capable of minute facial movements. You can sort through clips that use just one user face, or multiples that let you add up to three different people. The resulting video can then be stuck on a social networking page, or shared with a simple link.

For now you're limited to 10 clips, but the company is planning to add more every day. Eventually Gizmoz aims to let users use the same technology on any of its videos, allowing you to paste your friend's head on the family dog, or onto the Thanksgiving turkey.

I've embedded a sample video below, which I put together in just a few minutes. The facial processor only hiccupped once, but it was because of my crummy photo of Rafe's head. If you've already got processed 3-D heads in your gallery, it takes a little over a minute to put the entire thing together. My one qualm is that while depending on the original clip, the heads tend to be tiny and the video only comes in one size, although I think you'll agree this is a pretty great way to make embarrassing videos of your boss.

About the author

Josh Lowensohn joined CNET in 2006 and now covers Apple. Before that, Josh wrote about everything from new Web start-ups, to remote-controlled robots that watch your house. Prior to joining CNET, Josh covered breaking video game news, as well as reviewing game software. His current console favorite is the Xbox 360.

 

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