Get docs from pics with Qipit

Take shots of notes, whiteboards, or any ol' text with Qipit and "keep it"...get it?

Qipit is a free service for turning digital photos into sharable, online documents. It works with any photo taken with a digital camera, or from your mobile phone. Like ScanR (review), Qipit will store and host your photos, and let you rotate them to your heart's content. This works the best with shots of documents taken at an angle, and with whiteboards, business cards, etc. Once uploaded, Qipit will tweak the contrast of your shot, drawing out the text, and doing its best to correct perspective warp. Unlike ScanR however, you're not getting the archival goodness of optical character recognition to turn those notes into searchable text. Instead, it's up to you to tag your shots for easy sorting later on.

Qipit can turn handwritten notes into easy-to-read PDFs and JPEGs, although we didn't have much luck with angle correction. CNET Networks

Qipit has a few handy features, like storage for 100 different files, and a way to embed full versions of your scanned photo documents on your blog or Web site using a simple line of JavaScript. You can also process any old photo just by e-mailing with an attachment. Qipit will send you back a permalink to the full version, complete with links to download the shot as a PDF or JPEG.

I had mixed results with the service. All my test shots with oblique angles didn't receive any perspective correction, and the two I had selected for color instead of black and white turned out harder to read than they were originally. Also, many modern-day digital cameras have text and whiteboard modes that will either help you center your shots or do correction right in the camera (such as Casio's Exilim line). For phones however, Qipit is a slightly better solution than ScanR, which requires one megapixel or higher, leaving many phones in the dust.

[via Lifehacker]

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