Get better cell signal with Cell Rangers, hopefully

According to Cell Ranger, its new products help cell users get better service when in their car or at their computer.

Cell Ranger's cell signal boosters come in two versions, one for automobiles and one for computer users. Cell Ranger

I've never met a cell phone user who was completely happy with the quality of the service. It doesn't matter which carrier you have, once in a while, you'll won't be able to make calls, and will have lost connections or dropped calls. The new iPhone 3G has also been suffering from poor 3G signal reception that the latest firmware, 2.0.2, failed to fix .

However, maybe there's a solution for this after all. At least this is what Cell Ranger, a company that focuses on enhancing your wireless experience, would like you to believe with its latest inventions. On Thursday, the company released its two cell signal booster products called Cell Ranger Stix and Cell Ranger Port for automobiles and computer users. Both products are compatible with any wireless carriers in the U.S. and Canada, except for iDEN networks, such as Nextel.

The products feature a microprocessor that receives, analyzes, and selectively amplifies the wireless signal based on real time signal condition to provide the optimal reception. The proposed result is a more consistent signal, fewer dropped calls, and faster 3G data access for up to three simultaneous users within a six-foot radius.

Cell Ranger claims that its products can provide 2 to 3 bars extra signal for any cell phone or 3G data card, boost the data download speed up to 100 percent of bandwidth, and prevent dropped calls as well as improve call clarity. The Cell Range Stix works with any automobile's 12V cigarette lighter adapter while the Cell Ranger Port draws power from any computer's USB port.

Both products costs $150 each and comes with 30-day money back warranty. This seems very auspicious but I need to experience it to believe it.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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