Germany on open source: "Dieses ist sehr gut!!!"

Germany is apparently the biggest adopter of open source, but when is it going to start paying for it?

If you're looking for heavy open source adoption, apparently the place to go is the Fatherland, at least according to this article in Heise. Citing zero licensing fees, access to source code, freedom from lock-in, and other factors, the Germans are on an open source binge:

In a survey of IT procurement officers from Germany, Great Britain, and the US/Canada, 59 percent of those in Germany said that they use OSS in their companies. The figures were far lower in Great Britain and the US/Canada at 48 and 38 percent, respectively.

Nicht schlecht! While I'm glad for Germany, I don't mind a 38% adoption rate in the US, either. Having said that, my experience is that the US pays for open source, whereas Europe does not (which would seem to be in keeping with the survey's finding that Germans like open source, at least in part, because of its $0.00 acquisition price). Still, with ~60% of German companies in the open source camp, that can't help but translate into money at some point.

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About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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