Galaxy Tab and Galaxy S successors to be announced at Mobile World Congress

A leaked document shows Samsung unveiling new models of two of its popular Android devices.

Samsung planning to announce successors to the Galaxy S and Galaxy Tab Samsung Hub

A recently leaked document from inside the Samsung camp confirms the handset maker's plans to unveil successors to its popular Galaxy devices at next month's Mobile World Congress.

The sheet, which has since been pulled offline, detailed PR planning for the company's Unpacked event. It looks like Samsung expects to debut the Galaxy S 2 and Galaxy Tab 2 on February 13. Being that this is as close as we have come to any actual confirmation of the devices, we don't know know what the hardware and software will look like. Officially, that is.

The Galaxy S 2 has been rumored to feature 1GB RAM and 2GHz of processing prowess, most likely a dual-core Tegra 2 chip. A 4.3-inch Super AMOLED Plus screen and an 8-megapixel camera capable of recording 1080p video have also been whispered about a time or two.

Provided that these are correct specifications, they are significant improvements on the Galaxy S and fit the "Evolution is fate" bill that Samsung is promising .

As far as the Galaxy Tab 2 is concerned, a few details surfaced late last week. Unconfirmed reports peg this tablet as having another 7-inch screen; however, the resolution is said to be running at 2048x1200 pixels. The tablet is said to run Android 2.3 at launch with 3.0 likely arriving at some point in the future.

Other details include a dual-core Tegra 2 processor, a 64GB hard drive, and 1GB RAM. The rear-facing camera is said to jump up to 8 megapixels with the front-facing camera getting bumped to 3 megapixels.

Mobile World Congress is but a few weeks away so we'll find out for sure Samsung has up its sleeve. CNET will be in attendance, reporting on whatever is it Samsung unpacks.

 

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